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 Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire 
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Blev medlem: 24 sep 2008, 10:08
Inlägg: 446
OS: Xubuntu
Utgåva: 14.04 Trusty Tahr LTS
Svara med citat
Inlägg Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire
Hello - i install this on Ubuntu and think this guide also work with Debian.
The guide explain how to install and configurate Tripwire on your system.
And also explain how to save the Tripwire database on removable media.

TRIPWIRE

Tripwire is a "intrusion detection system" ... this means that Tripwire don't prevent an intrusion, but it will notice if it has happen.
It works like this; Tripwire sign each file with a specific algorithm or key number on your operating system and save all the information on a database.
So if some one change of modifie any file, then Tripwire will notice this change, so no one can break into your computer without you being aware of that.

So each file gets a uniq id and if some one hack into your system Tripwire will notice the change with some critical files being modified.
The great thing with this guide is that in the end i will explain how you install the Tripwire database on removable media.
This means that if you get an intrusion - so cant they modifie or hack your Tripwire - it is safe and secure.

THE FIRST PART OF THE INSTALLATION


First you need to have a new installation from scratch, so you know that your operating system has not been temporized with.
Now you can connect to internet and install Tripwire.

Kod:
sudo apt-get update


Kod:
sudo apt-get install tripwire


Now when you run Tripwire installation it will ask you at the beginning to configuration email option.
Then you should pick "internetsystem" ...

Bild

After that it will ask you to add what kind of email you use.
Like hotmail.com or gmail.com

Bild

After this Tripwire will ask you if you want to install two secure keys.
The site key and the local key.

You should answer yes and continue doing so true the hole installation process.
It is a good idea if you have prepared your self with two good key phrases.
Two good passwords.


04 jun 2015, 17:20
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Blev medlem: 24 sep 2008, 10:08
Inlägg: 446
OS: Xubuntu
Utgåva: 14.04 Trusty Tahr LTS
Svara med citat
Inlägg Re: Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire
THE SECOND PART OF THE INSTALLATION

Now you have install the Tripwire process.
So now you need to install the Tripwire database.

Write the following code to install the database.

Kod:
sudo tripwire --init


In the end of the installation process of the database you should have seen error messages.
That was files that did not match your operating system.

Now you want to change and modifies Tripwire so it match your Debian system 100%
It does not do that by default.

So now we will create a file that show us what kind of error messages we got when we install the Tripwire database.
We create a file with the name "test_results"

Type the following code:

Kod:
sudo sh -c 'tripwire --check | grep Filename > test_results'


You will find the file in your home directory or at /etc/tripwire
Just click on the "test_results" file and it will open up with gedit by default.

This is how the file looks like on my system, can be different on your system.
Kod:
Filename: /etc/rc.boot
     Filename: /root/mail
     Filename: /root/Mail
     Filename: /root/.xsession-errors
     Filename: /root/.xauth
     Filename: /root/.tcshrc
     Filename: /root/.sawfish
     Filename: /root/.pinerc
     Filename: /root/.mc
     Filename: /root/.gnome_private
     Filename: /root/.gnome-desktop
     Filename: /root/.gnome
     Filename: /root/.esd_auth
     Filename: /root/.elm
     Filename: /root/.cshrc
     Filename: /root/.bash_profile
     Filename: /root/.bash_logout
     Filename: /root/.bash_history
     Filename: /root/.amandahosts
     Filename: /root/.addressbook.lu
     Filename: /root/.addressbook
     Filename: /root/.Xresources
     Filename: /root/.Xauthority
     Filename: /root/.ICEauthority
     Filename: /proc/4116/fd/3
     Filename: /proc/4116/fdinfo/3
     Filename: /proc/4116/task/4116/fd/3
     Filename: /proc/4116/task/4116/fdinfo/3


All this files gave you error messages when you install the Tripwire database.
Now we will remove this error messages from our Tripwire configuration.

To do that we have to open a file with the name twpol.txt
And we have to open the file using Nano

With Nano you only need to know two commands.
"ctrl o" and Enter save changes and "ctrl x" close the editor.

Now we will open the twpol.txt file that is the blue print for Tripwire - it is the file that control what files Tripwire should check.
You open the policy file writing following code:
Kod:
sudo nano /etc/tripwire/twpol.txt


This is how it looks like on my system:

Kod:
#
 # Standard Debian Tripwire configuration
 #
 #
 # This configuration covers the contents of all 'Essential: yes'
 # packages along with any packages necessary for access to an internet
 # or system availability, e.g. name services, mail services, PCMCIA
 # support, RAID support, and backup/restore support.
 #
 
 #
 # Global Variable Definitions
 #
 # These definitions override those in to configuration file.  Do not         
 # change them unless you understand what you're doing.
 #
 
 @@section GLOBAL
 TWBIN = /usr/sbin;
 TWETC = /etc/tripwire;
 TWVAR = /var/lib/tripwire;
 
 #
 # File System Definitions
 #
 @@section FS
 
 #
 # First, some variables to make configuration easier
 #
 SEC_CRIT      = $(IgnoreNone)-SHa ; # Critical files that cannot change
 
 SEC_BIN       = $(ReadOnly) ;        # Binaries that should not change
 
 SEC_CONFIG    = $(Dynamic) ;         # Config files that are changed
           # infrequently but accessed
           # often
 
 SEC_LOG       = $(Growing) ;         # Files that grow, but that
                 # should never change ownership
 
 SEC_INVARIANT = +tpug ;              # Directories that should never
           # change permission or ownership
 
 SIG_LOW       = 33 ;                 # Non-critical files that are of
          # minimal security impact
 
 SIG_MED       = 66 ;                 # Non-critical files that are of
          # significant security impact
 
 SIG_HI        = 100 ;                # Critical files that are
          # significant points of
          # vulnerability
 
 #
 # Tripwire Binaries
 #
 (
   rulename = "Tripwire Binaries",
   severity = $(SIG_HI)
 )
 {
  $(TWBIN)/siggen   -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  $(TWBIN)/tripwire  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  $(TWBIN)/twadmin  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  $(TWBIN)/twprint  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Tripwire Data Files - Configuration Files, Policy Files, Keys,
 # Reports, Databases
 #
 
 # NOTE: We remove the inode attribute because when Tripwire creates a
 # backup, it does so by renaming the old file and creating a new one
 # (which will have a new inode number).  Inode is left turned on for
 # keys, which shouldn't ever change.
 
 # NOTE: The first integrity check triggers this rule and each
 # integrity check afterward triggers this rule until a database update
 # is run, since the database file does not exist before that point.
 (
   rulename = "Tripwire Data Files",
   severity = $(SIG_HI)
 )
 {
  $(TWVAR)/$(HOSTNAME).twd -> $(SEC_CONFIG) -i ;
  $(TWETC)/tw.pol   -> $(SEC_BIN) -i ;
  $(TWETC)/tw.cfg   -> $(SEC_BIN) -i ;
  $(TWETC)/$(HOSTNAME)-local.key -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  $(TWETC)/site.key  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 
  #don't scan the individual reports
  $(TWVAR)/report   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) (recurse=0) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Critical System Boot Files
 # These files are critical to a correct system boot.
 #
 (
   rulename = "Critical system boot files",
   severity = $(SIG_HI)
 )
 {
  /boot   -> $(SEC_CRIT) ;
  /lib/modules  -> $(SEC_CRIT) ;
 }
 
 (
   rulename = "Boot Scripts",
   severity = $(SIG_HI)
 )
 {
  /etc/init.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc.boot  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rcS.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc0.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc1.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc2.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc3.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc4.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc5.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /etc/rc6.d  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 }
 
 
 #
 # Critical executables
 #
 (
   rulename = "Root file-system executables",
   severity = $(SIG_HI)
 )
 {
  /bin   -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /sbin   -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Critical Libraries
 #
 (
   rulename = "Root file-system libraries",
   severity = $(SIG_HI)
 )
 {
  /lib   -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 }
 
 
 #
 # Login and Privilege Raising Programs
 #
 (
   rulename = "Security Control",
   severity = $(SIG_MED)
 )
 {
  /etc/passwd  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /etc/shadow  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
 }
 
 
 
 
 #
 # These files change every time the system boots
 #
 (
   rulename = "System boot changes",
   severity = $(SIG_HI)
 )
 {
  /var/lock  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /var/run  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ; # daemon PIDs
  /var/log  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
 }
 
 # These files change the behavior of the root account
 (
   rulename = "Root config files",
   severity = 100
 )
 {
  /root    -> $(SEC_CRIT) ; # Catch all additions to /root
  /root/mail   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/Mail   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.xsession-errors  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.xauth   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.tcshrc   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.sawfish   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.pinerc   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.mc   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.gnome_private  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.gnome-desktop  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.gnome   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.esd_auth   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.elm   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.cshrc          -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.bashrc   -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.bash_profile  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.bash_logout  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.bash_history  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.amandahosts  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.addressbook.lu  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.addressbook  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.Xresources  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
  /root/.Xauthority  -> $(SEC_CONFIG) -i ; # Changes Inode number on login
  /root/.ICEauthority      -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Critical devices
 #
 (
   rulename = "Devices & Kernel information",
   severity = $(SIG_HI),
 )
 {
  /dev  -> $(Device) ;
  /proc  -> $(Device) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Other configuration files
 #
 (
   rulename = "Other configuration files",
   severity = $(SIG_MED)
 )
 {
  /etc  -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Binaries
 #
 (
   rulename = "Other binaries",
   severity = $(SIG_MED)
 )
 {
  /usr/local/sbin -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /usr/local/bin -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /usr/sbin -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /usr/bin -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Libraries
 #
 (
   rulename = "Other libraries",
   severity = $(SIG_MED)
 )
 {
  /usr/local/lib -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
  /usr/lib -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
 }
 
 #
 # Commonly accessed directories that should remain static with regards
 # to owner and group
 #
 (
   rulename = "Invariant Directories",
   severity = $(SIG_MED)
 )
 {
  /  -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
  /home  -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
  /tmp  -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
  /usr  -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
  /var  -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
  /var/tmp -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
 }


Here above can you see the rules that Tripwire follows to check your system.
Now we want to change and modify this file.

You have to comment out the files/rules that you don't need with a # sign.
You put the # sign in front of each line you don't need.

So now we can look at our "test_reults" file and comment out all does filenames with the twpol.txt file.
This is how it looks like when you comment out the files with # sign.

Kod:
{
    /root                -> $(SEC_CRIT) ; # Catch all additions to /root
    #/root/mail            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/Mail            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.xsession-errors        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.xauth            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.tcshrc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.sawfish            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.pinerc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.mc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.gnome_private        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.gnome-desktop        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.gnome            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.esd_auth            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.elm            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.cshrc                -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    /root/.bashrc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.bash_profile        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.bash_logout        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.bash_history        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.amandahosts        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.addressbook.lu        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.addressbook        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.Xresources        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.Xauthority        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) -i ; # Changes Inode number on login
    #/root/.ICEauthority            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;


Next you should continue comment out files.
In the "Boot Scripts" section so do you have /etc/rc.boot
This file does not exist on my Ubuntu system and if its the same with Debain - then you comment out that file.

Kod:
(
  rulename = "Boot Scripts",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    /etc/init.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    #/etc/rc.boot        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rcS.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc0.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc1.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc2.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc3.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc4.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc5.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc6.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}


There is more ...
The /proc file should you comment out because it does give allot or error messages for no reason at all.
But you should also add some specific /proc files that the system need to check.

This is how it should look like:

Kod:
{
        /dev                    -> $(Device) ;
        #/proc                  -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/devices           -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/net               -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/tty               -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/sys               -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/cpuinfo           -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/modules           -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/mounts            -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/dma               -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/filesystems       -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/interrupts        -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/ioports           -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/scsi              -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/kcore             -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/self              -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/kmsg              -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/stat              -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/loadavg           -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/uptime            -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/locks             -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/meminfo           -> $(Device) ;
        /proc/misc              -> $(Device) ;
}


Now you have a file-system that not get notice with the system and you have to add it.
/dev/pts

Kod:
{
    /dev        -> $(Device) ;
    /dev/pts    -> $(Device) ;
    #/proc        -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/devices    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/net    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/tty    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/sys    -> $(Device) ;


At last we will comment out some common /var location to avoid unnecessary error messages.

Kod:
)
{
    #/var/lock        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/var/run        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ; # daemon PIDs
    /var/log        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
}


Now you can save all changes with Nano - type "ctrl o" and Enter.
Close Nano with "ctrl x"

This is how the tailored blue print for the Tripwire database should look like:
You can open the file twpol.txt writing following command:

Kod:
sudo nano /etc/tripwire/twpol.txt


Kod:
#
# Standard Debian Tripwire configuration
#
#
# This configuration covers the contents of all 'Essential: yes'
# packages along with any packages necessary for access to an internet
# or system availability, e.g. name services, mail services, PCMCIA
# support, RAID support, and backup/restore support.
#
#
# Global Variable Definitions
#
# These definitions override those in to configuration file.  Do not         
# change them unless you understand what you're doing.
#
@@section GLOBAL
TWBIN = /usr/sbin;
TWETC = /etc/tripwire;
TWVAR = /var/lib/tripwire;
#
# File System Definitions
#
@@section FS
#
# First, some variables to make configuration easier
#
SEC_CRIT      = $(IgnoreNone)-SHa ; # Critical files that cannot change
SEC_BIN       = $(ReadOnly) ;        # Binaries that should not change
SEC_CONFIG    = $(Dynamic) ;         # Config files that are changed
                # infrequently but accessed
                # often
SEC_LOG       = $(Growing) ;         # Files that grow, but that
                         # should never change ownership
SEC_INVARIANT = +tpug ;              # Directories that should never
                # change permission or ownership
SIG_LOW       = 33 ;                 # Non-critical files that are of
                     # minimal security impact
SIG_MED       = 66 ;                 # Non-critical files that are of
                     # significant security impact
SIG_HI        = 100 ;                # Critical files that are
                     # significant points of
                     # vulnerability
#
# Tripwire Binaries
#
(
  rulename = "Tripwire Binaries",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    $(TWBIN)/siggen            -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    $(TWBIN)/tripwire        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    $(TWBIN)/twadmin        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    $(TWBIN)/twprint        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}
#
# Tripwire Data Files - Configuration Files, Policy Files, Keys,
# Reports, Databases
#
# NOTE: We remove the inode attribute because when Tripwire creates a
# backup, it does so by renaming the old file and creating a new one
# (which will have a new inode number).  Inode is left turned on for
# keys, which shouldn't ever change.
# NOTE: The first integrity check triggers this rule and each
# integrity check afterward triggers this rule until a database update
# is run, since the database file does not exist before that point.
(
  rulename = "Tripwire Data Files",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    $(TWVAR)/$(HOSTNAME).twd    -> $(SEC_CONFIG) -i ;
    $(TWETC)/tw.pol            -> $(SEC_BIN) -i ;
    $(TWETC)/tw.cfg            -> $(SEC_BIN) -i ;
    $(TWETC)/$(HOSTNAME)-local.key    -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    $(TWETC)/site.key        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    #don't scan the individual reports
    $(TWVAR)/report            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) (recurse=0) ;
}
#
# Critical System Boot Files
# These files are critical to a correct system boot.
#
(
  rulename = "Critical system boot files",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    /boot            -> $(SEC_CRIT) ;
    /lib/modules        -> $(SEC_CRIT) ;
}
(
  rulename = "Boot Scripts",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    /etc/init.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    #/etc/rc.boot        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rcS.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc0.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc1.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc2.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc3.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc4.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc5.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /etc/rc6.d        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}

#
# Critical executables
#
(
  rulename = "Root file-system executables",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    /bin            -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /sbin            -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}
#
# Critical Libraries
#
(
  rulename = "Root file-system libraries",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    /lib            -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}

#
# Login and Privilege Raising Programs
#
(
  rulename = "Security Control",
  severity = $(SIG_MED)
)
{
    /etc/passwd        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    /etc/shadow        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
}
 

#
# These files change every time the system boots
#
(
  rulename = "System boot changes",
  severity = $(SIG_HI)
)
{
    #/var/lock        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/var/run        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ; # daemon PIDs
    /var/log        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
}
# These files change the behavior of the root account
(
  rulename = "Root config files",
  severity = 100
)
{
    /root                -> $(SEC_CRIT) ; # Catch all additions to /root
    #/root/mail            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/Mail            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.xsession-errors        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.xauth            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.tcshrc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.sawfish            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.pinerc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.mc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.gnome_private        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.gnome-desktop        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.gnome            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.esd_auth            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.elm            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.cshrc                -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    /root/.bashrc            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.bash_profile        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.bash_logout        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.bash_history        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.amandahosts        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.addressbook.lu        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.addressbook        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.Xresources        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
    #/root/.Xauthority        -> $(SEC_CONFIG) -i ; # Changes Inode number on login
    #/root/.ICEauthority            -> $(SEC_CONFIG) ;
}
#
# Critical devices
#
(
  rulename = "Devices & Kernel information",
  severity = $(SIG_HI),
)
{
    /dev        -> $(Device) ;
    /dev/pts    -> $(Device) ;
    #/proc        -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/devices    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/net    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/tty    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/sys    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/cpuinfo    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/modules    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/mounts    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/dma    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/filesystems -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/interrupts -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/ioports    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/scsi    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/kcore    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/self    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/kmsg    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/stat    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/loadavg    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/uptime    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/locks    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/meminfo    -> $(Device) ;
    /proc/misc    -> $(Device) ;
}
#
# Other configuration files
#
(
  rulename = "Other configuration files",
  severity = $(SIG_MED)
)
{
    /etc        -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}
#
# Binaries
#
(
  rulename = "Other binaries",
  severity = $(SIG_MED)
)
{
    /usr/local/sbin    -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /usr/local/bin    -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /usr/sbin    -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /usr/bin    -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}
#
# Libraries
#
(
  rulename = "Other libraries",
  severity = $(SIG_MED)
)
{
    /usr/local/lib    -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
    /usr/lib    -> $(SEC_BIN) ;
}
#
# Commonly accessed directories that should remain static with regards
# to owner and group
#
(
  rulename = "Invariant Directories",
  severity = $(SIG_MED)
)
{
    /        -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
    /home        -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
    /tmp        -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
    /usr        -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
    /var        -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
    /var/tmp    -> $(SEC_INVARIANT) (recurse = 0) ;
}


Now you have to tell Tripwire that you made all this changes.
You have to tell Tripwire that you have tailored twpol.txt to match your Debian system.
Write the following code:

Kod:
sudo twadmin -m P /etc/tripwire/twpol.txt


Now you need to re-create the database to notice the changes.
Write following code:

Kod:
sudo tripwire --init


Now all the error messages should be gone when you run the Tripwire database process.
If not then you have to open the twpol.txt file again and make necessary changes.


04 jun 2015, 17:22
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Blev medlem: 24 sep 2008, 10:08
Inlägg: 446
OS: Xubuntu
Utgåva: 14.04 Trusty Tahr LTS
Svara med citat
Inlägg Re: Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire
THE THIRD PART OF THE INSTALLATION

Now lets say you get one intrusion on your Debian system, then that some one could modifie and crack you Tripwire.
But this is not the case, because we are going to save our Tripwire database on a USB stick.

As long we have our Tripwire database on removable media we will be very safe and secure.
This is a very high security measurement.

At /var/lib/tripwire can you find a folder with the name "report" and the database.
We will move the database to our USB stick and create a folder with the name report.

1. First you put in the USB stick on your computer, it should mount automatically - if not then you have to mount the USB stick.
You create a folder with the name tripwire on your USB stick.
Now you open up your tripwire folder on your USB stick and create one more folder within it with the name report.

2. Now you move the database from /var/lib/tripwire to your tripwire folder on your USB stick.
On my computer my database has the same name as my computer "patrik-ubuntu.twd"

3. With my ubuntu my USB stick is at " media folder " and the name of my USB stick is " 887D-1ED9 "
So the path to my USB stick is:

Kod:
/media/887D-1ED9/tripwire


Now you have to find your path to your USB stick on your Debian system.

Now we have to tell Tripwire that the database is on our USB stick and also tell Tripwire that is should send the reports to our USB stick.
To do that we have to open up the twcfg.txt file

Kod:
sudo nano /etc/tripwire/twcfg.txt


4. Change the patch for database and report
We will change DBFILE and REPORTFILE

This is how my path looks like to my USB stick:

Database

Kod:
/media/887D-1ED9/tripwire/$(HOSTNAME).twd


Report
Kod:
/media/887D-1ED9/tripwire/report/$(HOSTNAME) - $(DATE).twr


You have to find your path name with Debian.

Bild


THE LAST & FINAL PART OF THE INSTALLATION


Now we have to tell Tripwire about all our changes.
So we have to update and re-create some files.

1. First we have to update the site.key and twcfgl.txt
Kod:
sudo twadmin -m F -S /etc/tripwire/site.key /etc/tripwire/twcfg.txt


2. Next we update the twpol.txt file

Kod:
sudo twadmin -m P /etc/tripwire/twpol.txt


3. Now we have to re-create the database

Kod:
sudo tripwire -m i

4. At last you can run this code again:

Kod:
sudo twadmin -m F -S /etc/tripwire/site.key /etc/tripwire/twcfg.txt


NOW YOU CAN RUN AND CHECK TRIPWIRE DATABASE FROM YOU USB-STICK


Run a tripwire check:
Kod:
sudo tripwire --check


Now you can see on the report file below that the database has been read from the USB stick and that Tripwire wrote the report file to the USB stick.
All works great.

Kod:
patrik@patrik-ubuntu:~$ sudo tripwire --check
[sudo] password for patrik:
Parsing policy file: /etc/tripwire/tw.pol
*** Processing Unix File System ***
Performing integrity check...
### Warning: File system error.
### Filename: /var/lib/tripwire/patrik-ubuntu.twd
### No such file or directory
### Continuing...
Wrote report file: /media/887D-1ED9/tripwire/report/patrik-ubuntu-20140719-212845.twr


Open Source Tripwire(R) 2.4.2.2 Integrity Check Report

Report generated by:          root
Report created on:            Sat Jul 19 21:28:45 2014
Database last updated on:     Never

===============================================================================
Report Summary:
===============================================================================

Host name:                    patrik-ubuntu
Host IP address:              127.0.1.1
Host ID:                      None
Policy file used:             /etc/tripwire/tw.pol
Configuration file used:      /etc/tripwire/tw.cfg
Database file used:           /media/887D-1ED9/tripwire/patrik-ubuntu.twd
Command line used:            tripwire --check

===============================================================================
Rule Summary:
===============================================================================

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Section: Unix File System
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Rule Name                       Severity Level    Added    Removed  Modified
  ---------                       --------------    -----    -------  --------
  Other binaries                  66                0        0        0       
  Tripwire Binaries               100               0        0        0       
  Other libraries                 66                0        0        0       
  Root file-system executables    100               0        0        0       
  Tripwire Data Files             100               0        0        0       
* System boot changes             100               1        0        5       
  (/var/log)
  Root file-system libraries      100               0        0        0       
  (/lib)
* Critical system boot files      100               0        0        1       
* Other configuration files       66                0        0        6       
  (/etc)
  Boot Scripts                    100               0        0        0       
  Security Control                66                0        0        0       
* Root config files               100               0        0        2       
* Devices & Kernel information    100               1        1        0       
  Invariant Directories           66                0        0        0       

Total objects scanned:  32705
Total violations found:  17

===============================================================================
Object Summary:
===============================================================================

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: Unix File System
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rule Name: System boot changes (/var/log)
Severity Level: 100
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Added:
"/var/log/dmesg.4.gz"

Modified:
"/var/log/Xorg.0.log"
"/var/log/dmesg"
"/var/log/dmesg.1.gz"
"/var/log/dmesg.2.gz"
"/var/log/dmesg.3.gz"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rule Name: Other configuration files (/etc)
Severity Level: 66
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Modified:
"/etc"
"/etc/cups"
"/etc/cups/subscriptions.conf"
"/etc/cups/subscriptions.conf.O"
"/etc/mtab"
"/etc/tripwire/twpol.txt"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rule Name: Critical system boot files (/boot)
Severity Level: 100
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Modified:
"/boot/grub/grubenv"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rule Name: Root config files (/root)
Severity Level: 100
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Modified:
"/root/.pulse"
"/root/.pulse/9fc69314a76666ab4b21a64100000008-runtime"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rule Name: Devices & Kernel information (/dev/pts)
Severity Level: 100
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Added:
"/dev/pts/2"

Removed:
"/dev/pts/4"

===============================================================================
Error Report:
===============================================================================

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Section: Unix File System
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1.   File system error.
     Filename: /var/lib/tripwire/patrik-ubuntu.twd
     No such file or directory

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*** End of report ***

Open Source Tripwire 2.4 Portions copyright 2000 Tripwire, Inc. Tripwire is a registered
trademark of Tripwire, Inc. This software comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY;
for details use --version. This is free software which may be redistributed
or modified only under certain conditions; see COPYING for details.
All rights reserved.
Integrity check complete.

[b]NOTE[/b]
After you move the database from /var/lib/tripwire to the USB stick - then Tripwire will complain about it and give you a error message - you can ignore that and Tripwire works great with the new configuration.


Now if you are a Desktop user and will have Tripwire, then you have to check Tripwire for intrusion before you update/upgrade or install softwares on your system and after that update Tripwire with the new configuration.
You can also send a report to your email - my report end up at junk folder with gmail.

Kod:
sudo tripwire --test -e youremail@yourdomain.com


04 jun 2015, 17:23
Profil

Blev medlem: 24 sep 2008, 10:08
Inlägg: 446
OS: Xubuntu
Utgåva: 14.04 Trusty Tahr LTS
Svara med citat
Inlägg Re: Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire
Note that you should Always mount your usb stick and run
"sudo tripwire --check" to make sure you system is Clean Before you update and upgrade your system or install new software.
When you are done you only recreate a new fresh Tripwire database.
"sudo tripwire --init" and remove the usb stick.


04 jun 2015, 18:19
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Global Moderator
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Blev medlem: 09 jun 2012, 06:16
Inlägg: 4868
Ort: Boo
OS: Ubuntu
Utgåva: 18.04 Bionic Beaver LTS
Svara med citat
Inlägg Re: Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire
Källa tycks vara http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2235300

_________________
Bionic Beaver | Chrome 69β | HTTPS Everywhere | Privacy Badger


04 jun 2015, 18:42
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Blev medlem: 24 sep 2008, 10:08
Inlägg: 446
OS: Xubuntu
Utgåva: 14.04 Trusty Tahr LTS
Svara med citat
Inlägg Re: Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire
Det är ju jag :-) som heter patrikmellq på Ubuntu forum org
Så det är jag som lärt mig hur man installerar Tripwire och sprider det för att det var ett helvete att hitta en bra fullständig guide.
Men jag hade tur som fick hjälp, så nu hoppas jag att fler som vill känna sig lite tryggare med Ubuntu ska kunna installera Tripwire.


04 jun 2015, 20:15
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Blev medlem: 08 aug 2010, 13:49
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OS: Ubuntu
Utgåva: 18.04 Bionic Beaver LTS
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Inlägg Re: Complete beginners guide installing Tripwire
Bra jobbat - tack för att du delar med dig!


04 jun 2015, 22:34
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