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 Aktuell LoCo-debatt vecka 23 
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Inlägg Aktuell LoCo-debatt vecka 23
Dave Picirillo, som är en uppskattad och drivande Loco-aktivist i USA har skapat debatt om att LoCos skall flytta över till LibrePlanet.
Jag skickar länk nedan.
http://blog.thesilentnumber.me/2010/06/why-ubuntu-locos-should-move-to.html

Det har kommit en del invändningar från andra LoCo-medlemmar, men en av de mest genomtänkta var nedan från Michael Hall
Citat:
I understand what it is you want to accomplish by this, but I think that
upon closer inspection of the premise of your argument, you will see
that this not only is a less ideal approach than what we already have,
but may actually be detrimental to your stated cause.

As you implied, and was explicitly stated by someone else, Ubuntu LoCos
are not FLOSS advocacy groups, they are Ubuntu advocacy groups. You
view this as a narrowing of focus, when for most of us it is a
broadening of focus. I support Ubuntu not just because it is free
software, but because decisions are made more on practical improvements
than adherence to ideology or tradition. I like that community
involvement is not only encouraged but financially supported. That
Canonical spends time and effort directly on community projects, and
that they accept community contributions directly to Ubuntu projects. I
like the ethos of Canonical, not just the ethos of Free Software, and
thus my advocacy is not well suited for a community based on narrow
views of the Free Software community, but rather to the broader views
shared by the Ubuntu community.

It is true that Ubuntu LoCos share much the same goal as other FLOSS
groups. However, goals are a poor glue for binding together groups of
people. We have seen examples of this not just in FLOSS groups, but
also in political and special interest groups. History is filled with
examples which prove that what binds people together is a common path
that they follow, not a common destination that they are all moving
towards. Even today, in political and cultural conflicts around the
world, what keeps people working together is a sense of direction, not a
sense of destination. Ubuntu LoCos are an example of this, we regularly
have members that have little or no interest in FLOSS market share, but
connect with the community because they like the tools being developed,
of the friendships being fostered, or the support provided. If the only
thing we had in common was wanting to solve bug #1, we would be
fractured and infighting more often than we would be working towards
improvement.

There is an evolution that every new Linux user goes through, where they
declare that the different distros and desktop environments were causing
an unnecessary duplication of effort, and they advocate that if we would
just all join together, combine KDE and Gnome, combine Debian, Ubuntu,
Fedora and Suse, that the combination would somehow be greater than the
sum of it's parts. This notion of unifying all the different FLOSS
communities into a single entity that will be greater than the sum of
it's parts is, to me, the same mistake in assumptions. Our real
strength is in our diversity, because we can make more changes, try more
things, and learn what works faster when we each focus on our own
efforts in our own way. This is as true for communities and advocacy as
it is for software development. We would be more constrained by trying
to maintain unity in a single consolidated community than any one
community is by focusing on it's own efforts.

You asked if unifying efforts was more in line with the nature of FLOSS,
I would argue that it is in fact the opposite. The nature of FLOSS is
one of easy forking and incorporation based on merit. There are so many
examples of this that I don't even have to mention them, anybody reading
this will likely already have several brought to mind. The very
existence of Ubuntu is proof positive of this nature. A singular
product with a singular effort will always stagnate, while duplicate
products with duplicate efforts will continue to innovate, incorporating
the best ideas as they show themselves to be the best ideas, but always
with their own direction, their own path, and their own pace.

If somebody does not want to become involved in your LoCo because they
don't like what the "banner" represents, then they shouldn't be in your
LoCo, they should have their own efforts that follow their own
direction, with people who share the same direction. They can take what
ideas and processes we have that they believe are best, and leave those
they think are lacking, and we should encourage and support them in
doing this. But we should not say they should combine their efforts
with ours, or combine our efforts with theirs. We're all going to the
same place, but that doesn't mean we all have to take the same roads.


några funderingar på detta..

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09 jun 2010, 08:41
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